Tag Archives: urban fantasy

April 2019 Recommendations

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Show Title: All-American

Episodes: 13

Where to Watch: Netflix

If you miss old-school WB teen soaps, All-American is the show for you. Despite the football-heavy promos, it’s not Friday Night Lights. The football team is a part of it but more for what it represents to Spencer. It’s a character-focused soap and it’s best when it isn’t trying to be anything else. It does a decent job of weaving in more socially conscious stories and highlighting the differences in the characters from Crenshaw and Beverly Hills based on their economic privilege but it mostly wants to make you fall in love with these characters and root for their success and you can’t help but do so. Even when they are being messy and making bad choices out of pain or sometimes just because they’re human, you want the best for them. You want them to make good choices and grow into better people and find their place in the world. It’s may not be groundbreaking or revolutionary like Crazy Ex-Girlfriend or Jane the Virgin, but it’s a solid non-genre addition to CW’s lineup and I couldn’t be happier that it’ll be back for a second season.

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Book Title: Heroine Worship

Author: Sarah Kuhn

Genre: Urban Fantasy

I’ve already talked about my love for Heroine Complex, the first entry in this series, but I finally got around to this book and it only amplified my love for this series. Unlike other UF series, the protagonist of each book shifts, much like it would in a romance trilogy. It allows for a new exploration of the world but more interestingly, it allows for a strong character arc in each book. After the events of Heroine Complex, Aveda Jupiter is struggling. She’s no longer the star superhero in San Francisco and if she isn’t a superhero, who is she? She is forced to examine and reconcile competing portions of her identity, to recognize that she can be a protector and vulnerable at the same time. So much of this book is about Aveda and Evie learning how to be best friends again as adults and their relationship dynamic is unlike anything else I’ve seen. They have to learn to choose each other again, not in the archetypal roles that had defined their relationship as children but as grown women full of complexities. They got stuck and had to find a way to get unstuck because at the end of the day, there isn’t anyone they would rather have by their side. It’s about learning to embrace yourself and all the multitudes you contain and trust that there will be people to love and accept you once they’re allowed to truly see you. This series holds such a special place in my heart after only two books and I can’t wait for this journey to continue.